Menu
X

Category Archives: LaparoscopicSurgery

image

Endometriosis Surgery Cost in Lagos

Endometriosis Surgery Lagos

Endometriosis: What You Need to Know

Patients with endometriosis have endometrial-type tissue outside of the uterus.

Endometriosis affects an estimated 5 to 10 percent of women between the ages of 25 and 40.

Women with endometriosis are more likely to have infertility or difficulty getting pregnant.

Symptoms of endometriosis may include: excessive menstrual cramps, abnormal or heavy menstrual flow and pain during intercourse.

Laparoscopy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure, can be used to definitively diagnose and treat endometriosis.

 

What Causes Endometriosis

Heredity plays a role, and some endometrial cells may be present from birth. Another theory suggests that menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These cells are thought to stick to organs and keep growing and bleeding over time. Cells could also move to the pelvic cavity other ways, such as during a C-section delivery. A faulty immune system may fail to get rid of the misplaced cells.

 

Endometriosis Symptoms

 

The following are the most common symptoms for endometriosis, but each woman may experience symptoms differently or some may not exhibit any symptoms at all. Symptoms of endometriosis may include:

Pain, especially excessive menstrual cramps that may be felt in the abdomen or lower back

Pain during intercourse

Abnormal or heavy menstrual flow

Infertility

Painful urination during menstrual periods

Painful bowel movements during menstrual periods

Other gastrointestinal problems, such as diarrhea, constipation and/or nausea

 

Diagnosing Endometriosis

Endometriosis Tests include,

Ultrasound : A diagnostic imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to create an image of the internal organs

CT scan : A noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images — often called slices — of the body to detect any abnormalities that may not show up on an ordinary X-ray

MRI scan : A noninvasive procedure that produces a two-dimensional view of an internal organ or structure

A diagnosis of endometriosis can only be certain, though, when the doctor performs a laparoscopy, biopsies any suspicious tissue and the diagnosis is confirmed by examining the tissue beneath a microscope.

Endometriosis Complications

1. Infertility, which can affect 50 percent of those with the condition.
2. Increased risk of developing ovarian cancer or endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma
3. Ovarian cysts
4. Inflammation
5. Scar tissue and adhesion development
6. Intestinal and bladder complications

Endometriosis Treatment

Laparoscopy (also used to help diagnose endometriosis): Laparoscopic Treatment for Endometriosis a minor surgical procedure in which a laparoscope, a thin tube with a lens and a light, is inserted into an incision in the abdominal wall; using the laparoscope to see into the pelvic area, the doctor can often remove the endometrial growths.

Laparotomy: A more extensive surgery to remove as much of the displaced endometrium as possible without damaging healthy tissue

Hysterectomy : Surgery to remove the uterus and possibly the ovaries

 

image

Endometriosis Surgery Cost in Nigeria

Endometriosis Surgery Nigeria

Endometriosis: What You Need to Know

Patients with endometriosis have endometrial-type tissue outside of the uterus.

Endometriosis affects an estimated 5 to 10 percent of women between the ages of 25 and 40.

Women with endometriosis are more likely to have infertility or difficulty getting pregnant.

Symptoms of endometriosis may include: excessive menstrual cramps, abnormal or heavy menstrual flow and pain during intercourse.

Laparoscopy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure, can be used to definitively diagnose and treat endometriosis.

 

What Causes Endometriosis

Heredity plays a role, and some endometrial cells may be present from birth. Another theory suggests that menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These cells are thought to stick to organs and keep growing and bleeding over time. Cells could also move to the pelvic cavity other ways, such as during a C-section delivery. A faulty immune system may fail to get rid of the misplaced cells.

 

Endometriosis Symptoms

 

The following are the most common symptoms for endometriosis, but each woman may experience symptoms differently or some may not exhibit any symptoms at all. Symptoms of endometriosis may include:

Pain, especially excessive menstrual cramps that may be felt in the abdomen or lower back

Pain during intercourse

Abnormal or heavy menstrual flow

Infertility

Painful urination during menstrual periods

Painful bowel movements during menstrual periods

Other gastrointestinal problems, such as diarrhea, constipation and/or nausea

 

Diagnosing Endometriosis

Endometriosis Tests include,

Ultrasound : A diagnostic imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to create an image of the internal organs

CT scan : A noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images — often called slices — of the body to detect any abnormalities that may not show up on an ordinary X-ray

MRI scan : A noninvasive procedure that produces a two-dimensional view of an internal organ or structure

A diagnosis of endometriosis can only be certain, though, when the doctor performs a laparoscopy, biopsies any suspicious tissue and the diagnosis is confirmed by examining the tissue beneath a microscope.

Endometriosis Complications

1. Infertility, which can affect 50 percent of those with the condition.
2. Increased risk of developing ovarian cancer or endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma
3. Ovarian cysts
4. Inflammation
5. Scar tissue and adhesion development
6. Intestinal and bladder complications

Endometriosis Treatment

Laparoscopy (also used to help diagnose endometriosis): Laparoscopic Treatment for Endometriosis a minor surgical procedure in which a laparoscope, a thin tube with a lens and a light, is inserted into an incision in the abdominal wall; using the laparoscope to see into the pelvic area, the doctor can often remove the endometrial growths.

Laparotomy: A more extensive surgery to remove as much of the displaced endometrium as possible without damaging healthy tissue

Hysterectomy : Surgery to remove the uterus and possibly the ovaries

 

image

Hernia Surgery in Lagos

Hernia Surgery in Lagos

A hiatus hernia or hiatal hernia is when part of the stomach squeezes up into the chest through an opening (hiatus) in the diaphragm. A diaphragm is a large, thin sheet of muscle between the chest and the abdomen.

Symptoms:-
Heartburn
Regurgitation of food or liquids into the mouth
Backflow of stomach acid into the esophagus (acid reflux)
Difficulty swallowing
Chest or abdominal pain
Shortness of breath
Vomiting of blood or passing of black stools, which may indicate gastrointestinal bleeding.

Causes:
Age-related changes in your diaphragm
Injury to the area, for example, after trauma or certain types of surgery
Being born with an unusually large hiatus
Persistent and intense pressure on the surrounding muscles, such as while coughing, vomiting, straining during a bowel movement, exercising or lifting heavy objects.

Diagnosis:
Usually, a hiatus hernia can be diagnosed with an X-ray test called a barium swallow and meal. The patient is made to drink a glassful of contrast and a series of X-ray films are obtained which show whether the stomach or a part of it lies above the diaphragm muscle and whether a person has a hiatus hernia. Most patients require an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, where the doctor visually examines the oesophagus and stomach using a flexible telescope. In some cases, a CT scan may be required to find out which part of the stomach has slipped up into the chest.

Laparoscopic Hiatus Hernia Surgery :
A laparoscopic hiatus hernia surgery is a minimally invasive approach which involves specialized video equipments and instruments that allow the surgeon to repair a hiatus hernia via several small incisions, most of which are less than half centimeters in size.

The concept of this surgery remains same as in the open approach. The organs which have herniated into the chest are reduced back into the abdomen, the hernia sac is then removed and the diaphragm is repaired using either sutures or a piece of mesh and the part of the stomach is then wrapped partially or completely around the oesophagus. This will prevent the further reflux symptoms.

Benefits
The laparoscopic method requires much less cutting of the tissues.
There is significantly less pain after the operation compared to an open approach.
Patients will be able to return to normal activities faster.
Patients undergoing this approach will have fewer and smaller scars.
You will need a shorter hospitalization post surgery.
Minimal adverse complications.

image

Hernia Surgery in Nigeria

Hernia Surgery in Nigeria

A hiatus hernia or hiatal hernia is when part of the stomach squeezes up into the chest through an opening (hiatus) in the diaphragm. A diaphragm is a large, thin sheet of muscle between the chest and the abdomen.

Symptoms:-
Heartburn
Regurgitation of food or liquids into the mouth
Backflow of stomach acid into the esophagus (acid reflux)
Difficulty swallowing
Chest or abdominal pain
Shortness of breath
Vomiting of blood or passing of black stools, which may indicate gastrointestinal bleeding.

Causes:
Age-related changes in your diaphragm
Injury to the area, for example, after trauma or certain types of surgery
Being born with an unusually large hiatus
Persistent and intense pressure on the surrounding muscles, such as while coughing, vomiting, straining during a bowel movement, exercising or lifting heavy objects.

Diagnosis:
Usually, a hiatus hernia can be diagnosed with an X-ray test called a barium swallow and meal. The patient is made to drink a glassful of contrast and a series of X-ray films are obtained which show whether the stomach or a part of it lies above the diaphragm muscle and whether a person has a hiatus hernia. Most patients require an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, where the doctor visually examines the oesophagus and stomach using a flexible telescope. In some cases, a CT scan may be required to find out which part of the stomach has slipped up into the chest.

Laparoscopic Hiatus Hernia Surgery :
A laparoscopic hiatus hernia surgery is a minimally invasive approach which involves specialized video equipments and instruments that allow the surgeon to repair a hiatus hernia via several small incisions, most of which are less than half centimeters in size.

The concept of this surgery remains same as in the open approach. The organs which have herniated into the chest are reduced back into the abdomen, the hernia sac is then removed and the diaphragm is repaired using either sutures or a piece of mesh and the part of the stomach is then wrapped partially or completely around the oesophagus. This will prevent the further reflux symptoms.

Benefits
The laparoscopic method requires much less cutting of the tissues.
There is significantly less pain after the operation compared to an open approach.
Patients will be able to return to normal activities faster.
Patients undergoing this approach will have fewer and smaller scars.
You will need a shorter hospitalization post surgery.
Minimal adverse complications.

image

Laparoscopic Endometriosis in Nigeria

Laparoscopic Endometriosis in Nigeria

A laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that may be used to diagnose and treat various conditions, including endometriosis.

Image result for laparoscopic endometriosis surgery images

A laparoscopy for endometriosis is a low-risk and minimally invasive procedure. It’s typically performed under general anesthesia by a surgeon or gynecologist. Most people are released from the hospital on the same day. Overnight monitoring is sometimes required, though.

Endometriosis has been estimated to affect up to 10% of women. Approximately four out of every 1,000 women are hospitalized as a result of endometriosis each year. Women ages 25–35 are most affected, with 27 being the average age at diagnosis. The incidence of endometriosis is higher among white women and among women who have a family history of the disease.

Preparation & Procedure :

Patient may be instructed to not eat or drink for at least eight hours leading up to the procedure. Most laparoscopies are outpatient procedures. That means you don’t need to stay at the clinic or hospital overnight. However, if there are complications, you may need to stay longer.

The patient is given anesthesia before the procedure commences. The method of anesthesia depends on the type and duration of surgery, the patient’s preference, and the recommendation of the physician. General anesthesia is most common for operative laparoscopy, while diagnostic laparoscopy is often performed under regional or local anesthesia. A catheter is inserted into the bladder to empty it of urine; this is done to minimize the risk of injury to the bladder.

A small incision is first made into the patient’s abdomen in or near the belly button. A gas such as carbon dioxide is used to inflate the abdomen to allow the surgeon a better view of the surgical field. The laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that is inserted into the abdominal cavity through the incision. ../images taken by the laparoscope may be seen on a video monitor connected to the scope.

For this procedure, three or four incisions may be made in the woman’s lower abdomen (A). Carbon dioxide is pumped into the abdomen to create a condition called pneumoperitoneum, which gives the surgeon more room to work (B). A laparoscope with video monitor is used to view the internal structures, while endometrial growths are removed with other tools (C).

The surgeon will examine the pelvic organs for endometrial growths or adhesions (bands of scar tissue that may form after surgery or trauma). Other incisions may be made to insert additional instruments; this would allow the surgeon to better position the internal organs for viewing. To remove or destroy endometrial growths, a laser or electric current (electrocautery) may be used. Alternatively, implants may be cut away with a scalpel (surgical knife). After the procedure is completed, any incisions are closed with stitches.

Post OP Care – After procedure :

After the procedure is completed, the patient will usually spend several hours in the recovery room to ensure that she recovers from the anesthesia without complication. After leaving the hospital, she may experience soreness around the incision, shoulder pain from the gas used to inflate the abdomen, cramping, or constipation. Most symptoms resolve within one to three days.

You should avoid certain activities immediately after your surgery. These include:

  • intense exercise
  • bending
  • stretching
  • lifting
  • sexual intercourse

It can take a week or more before you’re ready to return to your regular activities.

Alternatives :

Severe endometriosis may need to be treated by more extensive surgery. Conservative surgery consists of excision of all endometrial implants in the abdominal cavity, with or without removal of bowel that is involved by the disease. Semi-conservative surgery involves removing some of the pelvic organs; examples are hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) and oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries). Radical surgery involves removing the uterus, cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes (called a total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy).

image

Fibroids Surgery Cost in Nigeria

Fibroid Surgery Cost in Nigeria

 

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. Fibroids, also known as uterine myomas, leiomyomas, or fibromas, are firm, compact tumors that are made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue that develop in the uterus. It is estimated that between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed. Some estimates state that up to 30 to 77 percent of women will develop fibroids sometime during their childbearing years, although only about one-third of these fibroids are large enough to be detected by a health care provider during a physical examination.

In more than 99 percent of fibroid cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous). These tumors are not associated with cancer and do not increase a woman’s risk for uterine cancer. They may range in size, from the size of a pea to the size of a softball or small grapefruit.

WHAT CAUSES FIBROID TUMORS?

While it is not clearly known what causes fibroids, it is believed that each tumor develops from an aberrant muscle cell in the uterus, which multiplies rapidly because of the influence of estrogen.

WHO IS AT RISK FOR FIBROID TUMORS?

Women who are approaching menopause are at the greatest risk for fibroids because of their long exposure to high levels of estrogen. Women who are obese and of African-American heritage also seem to be at an increased risk, although the reasons for this are not clearly understood.

Research has also shown that some factors may protect a woman from developing fibroids. Some studies, of small numbers of women, have indicated that women who have had two liveborn children have one-half the risk of developing uterine fibroids compared to women who have had no children. Scientists are not sure whether having children actually protected women from fibroids or whether fibroids were a factor in infertility in women who had no children. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development is conducting further research on this topic and other factors that may affect the diagnosis and treatment of fibroids.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF FIBROIDS?

Some women who have fibroids have no symptoms, or have only mild symptoms, while other women have more severe, disruptive symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for uterine fibroids, however, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms of uterine fibroids may include:

  • Heavy or prolonged menstrual periods
  • Abnormal bleeding between menstrual periods
  • Pelvic pain (caused as the tumor presses on pelvic organs)
  • Frequent urination
  • Low back pain
  • Pain during intercourse
  • A firm mass, often located near the middle of the pelvis, which can be felt by the physician

In some cases, the heavy or prolonged menstrual periods, or the abnormal bleeding between periods, can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which also requires treatment.

HOW ARE FIBROIDS DIAGNOSED?

Fibroids are most often found during a routine pelvic examination. This, along with an abdominal examination, may indicate a firm, irregular pelvic mass to the physician. In addition to a complete medical history and physical and pelvic and/or abdominal examination, diagnostic procedures for uterine fibroids may include:

  • X-ray. Electromagnetic energy used to produce images of bones and internal organs onto film.
  • Transvaginal ultrasound (also called ultrasonography). An ultrasound test using a small instrument, called a transducer, that is placed in the vagina.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A non-invasive procedure that produces a two-dimensional view of an internal organ or structure.
  • Hysterosalpingography. X-ray examination of the uterus and fallopian tubes that uses dye and is often performed to rule out tubal obstruction.
  • Hysteroscopy. Visual examination of the canal of the cervix and the interior of the uterus using a viewing instrument (hysteroscope) inserted through the vagina.
  • Endometrial biopsy. A procedure in which a sample of tissue is obtained through a tube which is inserted into the uterus.
  • Blood test (to check for iron-deficiency anemia if heavy bleeding is caused by the tumor).

TREATMENT FOR FIBROIDS

Since most fibroids stop growing or may even shrink as a woman approaches menopause, the health care provider may simply suggest “watchful waiting.” With this approach, the health care provider monitors the woman’s symptoms carefully to ensure that there are no significant changes or developments and that the fibroids are not growing.

In women whose fibroids are large or are causing significant symptoms, treatment may be necessary. Treatment will be determined by your health care provider(s) based on:

  • Your overall health and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference
  • Your desire for pregnancy

In general, treatment for fibroids may include:

  • Hysterectomy. Hysterectomies involve the surgical removal of the entire uterus. Fibroids remain the number one reason for hysterectomies in the United States.
  • Conservative surgical therapy. Conservative surgical therapy uses a procedure called a myomectomy. With this approach, physicians will remove the fibroids, but leave the uterus intact to enable a future pregnancy.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRH agonists). This approach lowers levels of estrogen and triggers a “medical menopause.” Sometimes GnRH agonists are used to shrink the fibroid, making surgical treatment easier.
  • Anti-hormonal agents. Certain drugs oppose estrogen (such as progestin and Danazol), and appear effective in treating fibroids. Anti-progestins, which block the action of progesterone, are also sometimes used.
  • Uterine artery embolization. Also called uterine fibroid embolization, uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a newer minimally-invasive (without a large abdominal incision) technique. The arteries supplying blood to the fibroids are identified, then embolized (blocked off). The embolization cuts off the blood supply to the fibroids, thus shrinking them. Health care providers continue to evaluate the long-term implications of this procedure on fertility and regrowth of the fibroid tissue.
  • Anti-inflammatory painkillers. This type of drug is often effective for women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort.

 

Find Best Laparoscopic Surgeon and Hospital near to your location,

Get Second Opinion from Expert Laparoscopic Surgeon

You can also Contact us: [email protected]

image

Fibroids Surgery Cost in Lagos

Fibroids Surgery Cost in Lagos

 

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. Fibroids, also known as uterine myomas, leiomyomas, or fibromas, are firm, compact tumors that are made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue that develop in the uterus. It is estimated that between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed. Some estimates state that up to 30 to 77 percent of women will develop fibroids sometime during their childbearing years, although only about one-third of these fibroids are large enough to be detected by a health care provider during a physical examination.

In more than 99 percent of fibroid cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous). These tumors are not associated with cancer and do not increase a woman’s risk for uterine cancer. They may range in size, from the size of a pea to the size of a softball or small grapefruit.

WHAT CAUSES FIBROID TUMORS?

While it is not clearly known what causes fibroids, it is believed that each tumor develops from an aberrant muscle cell in the uterus, which multiplies rapidly because of the influence of estrogen.

WHO IS AT RISK FOR FIBROID TUMORS?

Women who are approaching menopause are at the greatest risk for fibroids because of their long exposure to high levels of estrogen. Women who are obese and of African-American heritage also seem to be at an increased risk, although the reasons for this are not clearly understood.

Research has also shown that some factors may protect a woman from developing fibroids. Some studies, of small numbers of women, have indicated that women who have had two liveborn children have one-half the risk of developing uterine fibroids compared to women who have had no children. Scientists are not sure whether having children actually protected women from fibroids or whether fibroids were a factor in infertility in women who had no children. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development is conducting further research on this topic and other factors that may affect the diagnosis and treatment of fibroids.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF FIBROIDS?

Some women who have fibroids have no symptoms, or have only mild symptoms, while other women have more severe, disruptive symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for uterine fibroids, however, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms of uterine fibroids may include:

  • Heavy or prolonged menstrual periods
  • Abnormal bleeding between menstrual periods
  • Pelvic pain (caused as the tumor presses on pelvic organs)
  • Frequent urination
  • Low back pain
  • Pain during intercourse
  • A firm mass, often located near the middle of the pelvis, which can be felt by the physician

In some cases, the heavy or prolonged menstrual periods, or the abnormal bleeding between periods, can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which also requires treatment.

HOW ARE FIBROIDS DIAGNOSED?

Fibroids are most often found during a routine pelvic examination. This, along with an abdominal examination, may indicate a firm, irregular pelvic mass to the physician. In addition to a complete medical history and physical and pelvic and/or abdominal examination, diagnostic procedures for uterine fibroids may include:

  • X-ray. Electromagnetic energy used to produce images of bones and internal organs onto film.
  • Transvaginal ultrasound (also called ultrasonography). An ultrasound test using a small instrument, called a transducer, that is placed in the vagina.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A non-invasive procedure that produces a two-dimensional view of an internal organ or structure.
  • Hysterosalpingography. X-ray examination of the uterus and fallopian tubes that uses dye and is often performed to rule out tubal obstruction.
  • Hysteroscopy. Visual examination of the canal of the cervix and the interior of the uterus using a viewing instrument (hysteroscope) inserted through the vagina.
  • Endometrial biopsy. A procedure in which a sample of tissue is obtained through a tube which is inserted into the uterus.
  • Blood test (to check for iron-deficiency anemia if heavy bleeding is caused by the tumor).

TREATMENT FOR FIBROIDS

Since most fibroids stop growing or may even shrink as a woman approaches menopause, the health care provider may simply suggest “watchful waiting.” With this approach, the health care provider monitors the woman’s symptoms carefully to ensure that there are no significant changes or developments and that the fibroids are not growing.

In women whose fibroids are large or are causing significant symptoms, treatment may be necessary. Treatment will be determined by your health care provider(s) based on:

  • Your overall health and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference
  • Your desire for pregnancy

In general, treatment for fibroids may include:

  • Hysterectomy. Hysterectomies involve the surgical removal of the entire uterus. Fibroids remain the number one reason for hysterectomies in the United States.
  • Conservative surgical therapy. Conservative surgical therapy uses a procedure called a myomectomy. With this approach, physicians will remove the fibroids, but leave the uterus intact to enable a future pregnancy.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRH agonists). This approach lowers levels of estrogen and triggers a “medical menopause.” Sometimes GnRH agonists are used to shrink the fibroid, making surgical treatment easier.
  • Anti-hormonal agents. Certain drugs oppose estrogen (such as progestin and Danazol), and appear effective in treating fibroids. Anti-progestins, which block the action of progesterone, are also sometimes used.
  • Uterine artery embolization. Also called uterine fibroid embolization, uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a newer minimally-invasive (without a large abdominal incision) technique. The arteries supplying blood to the fibroids are identified, then embolized (blocked off). The embolization cuts off the blood supply to the fibroids, thus shrinking them. Health care providers continue to evaluate the long-term implications of this procedure on fertility and regrowth of the fibroid tissue.
  • Anti-inflammatory painkillers. This type of drug is often effective for women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort.

 

Find Best Laparoscopic Surgeon and Hospital near to your location,

Get Second Opinion from Expert Laparoscopic Surgeon

You can also Contact us: [email protected]

image

Laparoscopic Gastric Banding- Procedure,Pre & Post OP , Benefits

What is LAGB?
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. It’s done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the upper abdomen. The surgeon puts an adjustable band around the top part of the stomach. This creates a very small stomach pouch. The small stomach pouch means that you’ll feel full after eating less food. This will help you lose weight.

The band can be adjusted. This is done by adding or removing fluid in a balloon around the band. This is done through a port placed under the skin of your abdomen. A tube leads from the port to the band around your stomach. During office visits after surgery, your doctor will use a needle to go through your skin into the port. Fluid is injected into the port. The fluid goes through the tube into the balloon around the band and squeezes the top of the stomach. A small amount of fluid is usually added at each office visit, while your weight loss is checked. If the band becomes too tight, some fluid will be removed.

Why might I need LAGB?
LAGB is used to treat severe obesity. It’s advised for people who have tried other weight loss methods without long-term success. Your doctor may advise LAGB if you are severely obese with a body mass index (BMI) over 40. Your doctor may also advise it if you have a BMI between 35 and 40 and a health condition such as sleep apnea, high blood pressure, heart disease, or type 2 diabetes.

What are the risks of LAGB?
Bleeding, infection, and blood clots in your legs are possible side effects that may occur after any surgery. General anesthesia may also cause breathing problems or other reactions.

Other risks of LAGB can include slipping of the band, puncturing of the stomach, or food not going into the stomach. You may have food intolerance after gastric band surgery. For example, you may not be able to eat red meat, a major source of dietary iron. This would put you at a higher risk for anemia. Over time, a fibrous capsule to form around the stomach and band. This can make it hard to do any other surgery on the upper stomach later in life, if needed.

With LAGB, you may not lose as much weight as you would like. If your body mass index is over 50, the band might not be a good choice for you. If you are not physically active, you may not lose a lot of weight with the band.

You may have other risks based on your health. Make sure to talk with your healthcare team about any concerns before the surgery.

How do I get ready for LAGB?
Your healthcare team will need to make sure that LAGB is a good option for you. Weight-loss surgery isn’t advised for people who abuse medicines or alcohol, or who are not able to commit to a lifelong change in diet and exercise habits.

Before having surgery, you’ll need to enroll in a bariatric surgery education program. This will help you prepare for surgery, and life after surgery. You’ll have nutritional counseling. And you may have a psychological evaluation. You’ll also need physical exams and tests. You will need blood tests. You may have imaging studies of your stomach, or have an upper endoscopy.

If you smoke, you will need to stop several months before surgery. Your surgeon may ask you to lose some weight before surgery. This will help make your liver smaller, and make surgery safer. You’ll need to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen, and other blood-thinning medicines in the days before your surgery. You shouldn’t eat or drink anything after midnight before surgery.

What happens during LAGB?
LAGB surgery usually takes 30 to 60 minutes.
You will have general anesthesia for your surgery. This will cause you to sleep through the surgery, and not feel pain.
Your surgeon will use laparoscopy. He or she will make several small cuts (incisions) in your upper abdomen. The surgeon will then insert a laparoscope and put small surgery tools into these incisions.
The surgeon will put an adjustable gastric band around your upper stomach and then tighten it to make a small stomach pouch.
The surgeon will put a small port under the skin of your abdomen. A tube is connected between the port and the band.
If you have a hiatal hernia, your surgeon may repair that at the same time as your LAGB surgery.

What happens after LAGB?
You’ll likely go home the day after surgery. You will be on a liquid diet for the first week or two. Your surgery team will give you a schedule of types of meals over the next weeks. You’ll go from liquids, to pureed foods, then soft foods, and then to regular food. Each meal needs to be very small. You should make sure to eat slowly and chew each bite well. Don’t move too quickly to regular food. This can cause pain and vomiting. Work with your medical team to figure out what’s best for you to eat. After your stomach heals, you will need to change your eating habits. You’ll need to eat small meals for your small stomach.

People who have weight-loss surgery may have trouble getting enough vitamins and minerals. This is because they take in less food, and may absorb fewer nutrients. You may need to take a daily multivitamin, plus a calcium-vitamin D supplement. You may need additional nutrients, such as vitamin B12 or iron. Your medical team will give you instructions.

You’ll need to have regular blood tests every few months in the year after surgery. This is to make sure you don’t have low blood iron (anemia), high blood glucose, or low calcium or vitamin D levels. If you have heartburn, you may need to medicine to reduce stomach acid.

After losing weight, it’s possible to regain some of the weight that you lose. To avoid this, make sure to follow a healthy diet and get regular exercise. The sleeve may widen (dilate) over time. This will let you eat more. But keep in mind that if you eat all you can, you can regain weight. You may want to join a weight-loss surgery support group to help you stick with your new eating habits.

You’ll need to have life-long medical visits to check for problems with the band, and have band adjustments as needed.

image

Laparocopic Duodenal Switch – Ileal Transposition

The duodenal Switch (DS) surgery or ileal transposition is a modification of the BPD designed to prevent the ulcers, increase the amount of gastric restriction, minimize the incidence of dumping syndrome and reduce the severity of the protein-calcium malnutrition. However, the dumping syndrome is believed to be a benefit rather than a detriment which helps the patient to avoid eating sugary and high fat foods that would adversely affect the weight loss. These operations are some of the most complex in the bariatric surgery.
It causes restriction by reducing the amount of food you consume and also causes malabsorption by reducing the amount of calories that get absorbed by your body. Duodenal switch surgery is one of the major weight loss surgeries and it is also irreversible.

If your BMI is greater than 60, you may not be a good candidate for this approach.
If you are pregnant, you should not consider DS. If you are planning to get this procedure done, you should wait for a total of 18 months after the surgery before you get pregnant.
If you have had an abdominal operation before, you may have developed come scars as well as adhesions that can make DS more difficult and take a lot of time.

What to Expect with Duodenal Switch (DS)?
During this procedure, your surgeon will remove a large portion of your stomach and reroute your small intestine. Following this procedure, you’ll eat less and will absorb fewer calories that you eat. The duodenal switch surgery leads to rapid weight loss within 12 to 18 months following surgery.

Pre-Surgery Preparation: Before undergoing this surgery, your doctor will ask you to prepare in a number of ways. You’ll be asked to quit smoking 30 days prior to the procedure. You may need to take the vitamin supplements to prevent post-operative nutritional deficiency. Your doctor will want you to lose about 5 to 10% of your body weight before this surgery, in order to facilitate recovery and post-op weight loss. You’ll be asked to avoid alcohol for about 48 hours before the surgery.
The Surgery Itself: During this procedure, you’ll be given general anaesthesia and the surgeon will remove about 75 to 85% of your stomach along with the greater curvature. He will reroute the small intestine, leave the pyloric valve and part of the duodenum intact. Finally, you’ll have only 18 to 24 inches of small intestine left for the absorption of the nutrients from the food. The surgery can take up to 3 to 4 hours for completion. Your surgeon may elect to perform this procedure in two parts. You can expect to spend up to 4 weeks recovering from this procedure.
Postoperative Recovery: Immediately following this procedure, you’ll be able to eat liquid foods. You’ll gradually begin eating purees and then the solid foods as you begin to recover.

 

image

LAPAROSCOPIC BILIOPANCREATIC DIVERSION (BPD) SURGERY

The laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery restricts both the food intake and the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed by your body.

Indications :
Patients with BMI over 50
Redo Surgery after other metabolic operations in patients with high compliance
Treatment of:
Arterial Hypertension
Diabetes Mellitus Type II
Hyperlipoproteinemia
Other related diseases
Sweets Eaters
Stress Eaters
Binge Eaters
Accepts obligatory supplementation of vitamins and minerals
Patients with heartburn

Open vs. laparoscopic BPD/DS :
BPD/DS is done as either laparoscopic or traditional open surgery. In open surgery, the healthcare provider makes a cut in your belly area. Laparoscopic BPD/DS requires much smaller cuts and it uses small instruments with a lighted camera to perform the surgery. Laparoscopic surgery can help you recover more quickly and may reduce the risk for complications, such as infections and hernias. Some bariatric surgeons use a laparoscopic surgical robot to help do part of the operation.

Benefits of the procedure :
The BPD/DS can produce a large weight loss, more than 150 pounds, because it restricts how much food you can eat and also reduces how many calories you can absorb. It helps to maintain this weight loss over many years, probably better than either the gastric bypass or the sleeve gastrectomy. It reduces the amount of fat that your body will absorb. It also helps you lose weight. If you do eat fatty meals, you may have stomach cramping and loose stools. It also helps to control diabetes over the long term, even better than the gastric bypass or the sleeve gastrectomy.

Risks of the procedure :
BPD/DS reduces the absorption of essential vitamins and minerals and can result in serious, long-term complications. People who have BPD/DS may develop anemia, osteoporosis, or kidney stones.

In addition, people who have undergone BPD/DS are at high risk for calcium and iron deficiencies. These people are also at high risk for deficiencies in vitamins A, D, E, and K, the fat-soluble vitamins.

Although rare, a thiamine deficiency can happen after BPD/DS surgery. This can damage the nervous system if untreated.

Up to 18% of people with a BPD/DS surgery also develop some element of protein-energy malnutrition. When severe, this condition is known as kwashiorkor, a severe and potentially life-threatening form of malnutrition.

If you have BPD/DS surgery, you will need to take vitamin and mineral supplements and have regular blood testing for the rest of your life. This is done to prevent severe vitamin deficiencies and related complications. Even if you take the supplements as prescribed, you still may develop nutritional problems and need treatment.

Top Hospitals for Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) Surgery in India :
The top hospitals for biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) Surgery in India are at par with the international standards. Our best hospitals have trained and experienced surgeons offering the best medical treatments, care and services to our international patients. Our pool of trained doctors, nurses and hospitals offers the international standard treatments at the most affordable prices.

The top hospitals for biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery in India are: Global Hospitals, Mumbai, Fortis Healthcare Hospital, Chennai, Hyderabad, Gurgaon and Max Healthcare Hospital, New Delhi

Leading Laparoscopic Surgeon – Dr. Manjunath C S from India is coming to Nigeria.
Location: Lagos, Port Harcourt and Kano
Date: 2nd to 5th November 2018

                     Contact us now,
Get Expert Second Opinion;  Large Discounts

Get Expert Second Opinion & Cost Estimate from leading Hospitals near to you







Recently joined
September 15, 2018
September 18, 2018
February 3, 2016
August 3, 2018
Latest Hospital
September 16, 2018
September 16, 2018

© Copyright 2018 laparoscopysurgeries.